• A Day in the Life…Modular

    Speaking of boxes…modular furniture is becoming quite popular (let’s just say again) and it’s not necessarily a new idea. Though the concept of “unit furniture” dates back to the early 20th century, the interpretation of the modular systems we recognize today was developed in the 1940’s by a furniture designer named Harvey Probber. If you study interior spaces, you will see the idea of multi-configuration, customizable furniture options sprinkled throughout our modern history of design, not only in just furniture, but office systems, cabinetry, etc. The progression of this concept from Harvey has, in a sense, revolutionized the design world, affording us the opportunity and ability to redefine a space by only rearranging it’s “modules”. This becomes increasingly important the more your space is limited, because one piece of furniture may need to serve multiple purposes.

     

    Here is where the modular system or modular furniture opens up a world of possibilities.   Far gone in the modern design paradigm are the parameters of compartmentalizing a space. The progression of that idea is found in the utilization of furniture to help “define” a room. It maintains the “open concept” many prefer, while still giving the clarity within the design aesthetic to specify a purpose for the space. Taking it one step further is to apply a modular system to that space in a way which provides multiple definitions, instead of just one. For instance, let’s implement this idea for a condo with limited space (a concept I was exploring this week). Instead of configuring a modular sectional in the “standard” way…making it a sofa with an extended chaise…why not convert the corner piece to an ottoman?! By doing this, even if the sectional rests on one wall, you have essentially redefined its use, because it can now be accessed from both sides. This not only adds functionality to the entire space, as a whole, it also ties multiple rooms together…the essence of modular design! (If this isn’t making sense, my work line is on the website, so just give me a call).

    Here is example from Soft Square in Sarasota!

     

    Joseph D. Clark

    Design Consultant

    Chic on the Cheap

    1.866.663.6062

    www.chiconthecheap.net

     

     

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